Advice and warnings on scams

What to look for if you suspect you've received a scam email, phone or social media post from Qantas.

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How to recognise authentic Qantas communications

From time to time we are made aware of email scams and social media posts that claim to be authentic Qantas communications. These may ask customers to visit an external site and download a file or confirm customer details.

We will never ask customers to click a link to download a file about bookings from a website, including our own. We send important documents that relate to your booking as Adobe Acrobat (PDF) files that you can download directly.

Below are some examples of scams that have recently been sent out to customers. If you receive one of these emails we recommend you delete it immediately and do not open it or download the attachment.

You can also refer to our FAQs:

Scam phone calls or suspicious emailsOpens external site.

Emails received that I believe are not from QantasOpens external site.

Fake offer to invest in Qantas bonds

We've been made aware of fraudulent offers circulating on websites and social media, inviting people to invest in Qantas bonds at a very high rate of return.

These offers are clearly fake as we don't offer bonds to the general public or retail investors, and therefore these offers should be regarded as a scam.

We're working with authorities in this matter. You can find more information about scams of this kind from the Australian Securities and Investment CommissionOpens external site in a new window (ASIC).

If you believe you're a victim of this bond scam, report the scam to ASICOpens external site in a new window to help them identify the scammer and prevent the scam from spreading. 

Seat selection fee receipt

You can easily identify this as a scam by the following details:

  • There is no reference to the customer name, booking reference or itinerary details.
  • The details show incorrect amounts paid for seat selection.
  • We never send file attachments with seat selection fee receipts.

Qantas e-tickets

How to recognise an official Qantas e-ticket and itinerary:

  • Emails will have a PDF attachment, never a .zip file.
  • Your booking reference and travel itinerary will be included.
  • Our emails will come from a qantas.com.au email address.

Cancelled flight refunds

Scam phone calls

We are aware that some customers are receiving phone calls claiming to be from the Qantas Refund Team. The callers are asking customers to provide their credit card details so that their refund for a cancelled flight can be processed. These calls are not from us.

Recipients are advised not to provide personal or financial details and not to respond to these phone calls.

If a Qantas Consultant calls a customer directly to discuss their booking, they will always verify the customer's identity before providing or discussing any booking details. If you need to speak to a Qantas Consultant directly, call 13 13 13 within Australia or your local Qantas office.

Fake websites

We are aware that some customers are also accessing websites claiming to be Qantas websites. These websites list 'TOLL-FREE' 1800 numbers for the customer to call for their flight cancellation refunds. These websites and numbers are not authentic Qantas websites or numbers.

To manage your booking including any refunds, visit qantas.com and select Manage Booking, then enter your details and follow the relevant steps.

You can report a scam and find more information at SCAMwatchOpens external site in a new window.

If you believe your identity or personal information has been compromised, stolen or misused, you can also contact IDCAREOpens external site in a new window. Note: IDCARE is only able to assist Australian and New Zealand residents.

Reminder: When you make a Qantas booking, you'll be issued a booking reference (also known as a passenger name reference (PNR)). This reservation code serves as a unique passenger identifier and can be used to access and update your personal information. We recommend that you do not disclose your PNR to anyone else and that you do not post a photo of your boarding pass or ticket on social media.

Scam emails relating to 'Don't let your Relief Bonus go to waste'

We are aware some customers are receiving emails that appear to be from Qantas. These emails are not genuine and encourage customers to click on a link which requests personal frequent flyer information.

We advise recipients not to click on the link and not to provide any personal information in response.

Unfortunately, scammers can spoof their email display name which makes it confusing for the recipient to recognise when a legitimate email has been received and when it is a phish (scam). These emails – because of the email display name – can then be grouped with genuine emails sent by Qantas.

We’ve so far identified emails with the following subjects as belonging to this phishing (scam) campaign:

  • "Don't let your Relief Bonus go to waste"
  • “Your Personal Coronavirus Relief Bonus is 1 Free Flight to New Zealand”
  • “Amazing Christmas Giveaway at Qantas”
  • “Qantas Anniversary Celebration Giveaway”

If you’d like more information about how to protect yourself online, visit the Australian Government’s Stay Smart Online websiteOpens external site in a new window and SCAMwatchOpens external site in a new window.

Fake Qantas Facebook pages

Sometimes fake Qantas Facebook pages will make offers to the general public. Please disregard any offers or posts shared by these pages. We work with Facebook to ensure these pages and content are removed as quickly as possible. There is only one official Qantas Facebook pageOpens external site in a new window.

For more information about how you to protect yourself online, visit Stay Smart OnlineOpens external site in a new window, an Australian Government website.

Scam phone calls claiming to be from Qantas

We are aware that some customers are receiving automated phone calls purporting to be from Qantas. These calls are not from us, and can easily be identified as unauthentic. Qantas consultants will always call customers directly to discuss their bookings and do not use an automated phone system when contacting customers proactively.

Recipients are advised not to provide personal details or respond to the automated prompts.

Scammers use a range of mechanisms, including "harvesting" programs that scour numerous sources on the Internet, to look for customer information. It is also often the case that the recipients of the scam are not customers of the company purporting to make the phone call - which is why individuals who are not necessarily Qantas customers might have also received a phone call.

You can report a scam and find more information at SCAMwatchOpens external site in a new window.

Scam text messages relating to mystery box prize

We are aware some customers are receiving text messages that appear to be from Qantas, suggesting they have won a ‘mystery box’ prize.

These messages are not genuine and encourage customers to click on a link which requests personal information.

We advise recipients not to click on the link and not to provide any personal information in a response.

Unfortunately scammers can change sender ID names which makes it confusing for the recipient to recognise when a legitimate message has been sent and when it is a scam. These messages – because of the sender ID name – can then be grouped with genuine messages with Qantas.

If you’d like more information about how to protect yourself online, visit the Australian Government’s Stay Smart Online websiteOpens external site in a new window and SCAMwatchOpens external site in a new window